Belfast Free Library Short Poem Contest for Teens

Teens: celebrate National Poetry Month & Earth Day by writing a short poem and hanging it on the "Poet Tree"!
During the Month of April the Belfast Free Library Teen Room is holding a short poem contest to celebrate National Poetry Month and Earth Day.
For this contest, teens write a short poem–a haiku or “two-line”–and hang it on the tree in the BFL Teen Room. All poems need to include at least one (can include more) seasonal word or word having to do with the earth, nature, and/or our environment. There will be prizes for the strongest poem, the runner-up, and for a poem selected by random drawing (everyone who writes a poem will be entered into the drawing). Guidelines for writing the poems, as well as cards for hanging them, will be provided.

This April in the BFL Teen Room with Poetry / Poet Tree!

Cards for hanging the poems can be downloaded here:  Poetry Leaves 1Poetry Leaves 2

 

Guidelines:

Celebrate National Poetry Month & Earth Day by writing a short poem and hanging it on the “Poet Tree” in the BFL Teen Room! There will be prizes for the strongest poem, the runner-up, and for a poem selected by random drawing (everyone who writes a poem will be entered into the drawing). Cards for writing and hanging your poems will be provided. Poems must be short and either in the form of a haiku or a two-line poem. All poems need to include at least one (can include more) seasonal word or word having to do with the earth, nature, and/or our environment. For this contest, your haiku should follow the 5/7/5 syllables-per-line structure: A bare pecan tree slips a pencil shadow down a moonlit snow slope. If you decide to write a two-line poem, your poem will be just that: two lines! Two line poems can be any number of sentences or phrases (or just one sentence or phrase) long, but the poem is broken into just two lines: so innocent this scene, I feel I see it with a deer’s eye Often the second line of a two line poem completes the thought or surprises us (we don’t expect the poem to end the way it does!). The acorn caps, the oak leaves, the chewed up little shoe—we made everything a talisman. The second line might also read like the punchline to a joke (that is to say, have fun with these!).

Poetry & Our Earth — What Wonderful Things to Celebrate!

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