Poet Elizabeth Garber Shares Her Thoughts on the Completion of Her New Memoir

Implosion: The Architect’s Daughter After five years of working on a coming of age story of an Architect’s Daughter, working with phenomenal teachers and mentors, learning to write and think like a prose writer, deep diving again and again into my history with incredible help from my friends and family who were there, I have […]

E.Garber

Implosion: The Architect’s Daughter

After five years of working on a coming of age story of an Architect’s Daughter, working with phenomenal teachers and mentors, learning to write and think like a prose writer, deep diving again and again into my history with incredible help from my friends and family who were there, I have finally finished the book I dreamed of writing. Of course a book is a living organism and changes will happen, but this is a moment to celebrate!
In the last year I’ve received incredible guidance first from Monica Wood and later when I was completely stuck on how to continue I worked with the remarkably skillful writing coach Polly Bennell. With her steady mentoring, my story is now called Implosion: The Architect’s Daughter, and is tightly framed from 1967 to 1972, following the rise and fall of my family in a parallel destructive dance with my father’s last building, a mirror glass tower, that was imploded twenty years later in the single largest implosion in the Western Hemisphere.

Here is the brief description of the book:
The story is set in upper-middle class privilege in the Cincinnati, Ohio of the 1960s, where teen Elizabeth Garber finds herself part of a family work crew conscripted by her father to complete his visionary modernist Glass House.  Meanwhile, for accomplished architect Woodie Garber everything is suddenly going wrong: his commission for a glass tower is fraught with tragic flaws, social movements of the late 60s threaten his role as supreme ruler of the home, and Elizabeth’s first love, a black young man, triggers her father’s hidden racism in an era of uncompromising racial and political tension. Soon Elizabeth’s life and those of her mother and siblings turn nightmarish as her father, always zealous and uncompromising, becomes obsessed with making the house a showplace, and his children servants to his needs.

Now I’m writing to literary agents to find representation.

Elizabeth W. Garber, 2006 Poet Laureate of Belfast, Maine, is the author of three books of poetry, True Affections: Poems from a Small Town, Listening Inside the Dance (2005) and Pierced by the Seasons (2004). Three of her poems have been read by Garrison Keillor on The Writer’s Almanac.

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