SCULPTURE x 4

Four sculpture studios, with solo and partner artists, are making art in Waldo County, and also part of Belfast Creative Coalition. They share mutual affinities but veer off into their own personal worlds of expression.   Works by Jeffery Ackerman Jeffrey Ackerman  Ackerman works in a studio adjacent to an old apple tree orchard, surrounded by a […]

Four sculpture studios, with solo and partner artists, are making art in Waldo County, and also part of Belfast Creative Coalition. They share mutual affinities but veer off into their own personal worlds of expression.
 

Works by Jeffery Ackerman

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song-of-orpheus-2_0apolloackermanSphinx-I_2015ackerman

Jeffrey Ackerman  Ackerman works in a studio adjacent to an old apple tree orchard, surrounded by a forest of oaks, maples and conifers. He experiments with aspects of ancient art, especially the Classical, working in wood, stone, clay and bronze that evoke Mediterranean Venuses, Bacchae, the sphinx and satyrs, and biblical figures.

 

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Works by Kimberly Callas

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Kimberly-Callas-Green-Man-e1408561131221

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Kimberly Callas sculpts life-size figures in water-based clay, then finished in concrete, colored with ground pigments and embellished with natural materials such as wasp paper, bark, roots, and seeds in the tradition of indigenous sculptors, using art as sacred object linked with the physical world.

Her goal is to “access our ecological selves”, the interconnectedness of self and Nature.

After researching archetypal symbols, circle, center, sun, mountain, and cave, she “would then pray using meditative writing techniques and in that way, prepare myself for the sculpting sessions.”

 

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Works by Sarah Hewitt
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Sarah Hewittwho is graduating this year with an MFA in Visual Arts from SUNY Purchase College, works with raffia and coir, the fibers of palm fronds and coconut husks, along with seagrass and weathered marine rope to fabricate torsos and semi-abstract pieces.

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“I wander about the studio stitching, cinching, unraveling and revealing different layers of fiber. Weave, unweave, stitch, suture and skin over with wax, tar, cement, whatever raw materials I can find ”. The concentation of the work allows her to tackle personal taboo items of “aggression and sexuality I am unable to not speak of”, art as struggle and challenge, literally groping in the darkness.

“The work is braver than I am,” she maintains.

 

 

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Phyla Collection Wayne Hall and Susan Camp    

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Wayne brings his extensive experience crafting furniture and sculpture from carefully selected native trees and hardwood. Susan etches images into copper using non-toxic techniques then carefully inks and patinas the surface. Her cultivated and gathered plant materials form the basis of the imagery. The resulting combinations of wood and copper are quiet, poetic ruminations celebrating the beauty of the materials and the cycles of our Maine landscape  


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Phyla-Collection_-Moss-in-cherry

 

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Callas and Hewitt both make use of objects from the natural world as their starting point, but the end results are vastly different. Callas taps into environmental cycles and indigenous cultures as a means to achieve harmony. Hewitt’s method is psychological and personal, using art as therapy.

Hall and Woods incorporate natural woods and plants, creating pleasing meditations on texture, elements, and colors. One feels a Thoreauvian contentment in the results and a celebration of place in the Maine woods.

Ackerman calls his contemporary paintings “metaphysical dramas”, while his sculptures take inspiration from the great Western world myths.

 

Tony Chiodo

Staff Writer for the Belfast Creative Coalition and author of Callie’s Revolution.

 

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